Friday, August 18, 2017

D’Angelo Lovell Williams’s show at Higher Pictures gallery

THE NEW YORK TIMES
By Roberta Smith
D'Angelo Lovell Williams "Untitled (Portrait)" (2017) pigment print 20 x 30 inches edition of 6
The 10 reverberant color photographs in D’Angelo Lovell Williams’s show at Higher Pictures form one of the year’s best gallery debuts. Seemingly uncomplicated and improvisational, the works set off startling strings of associations and meaning, tearing through references to race, gender, eroticism, art, fashion, culture and history like crashing dominoes. Yet silence reigns: All is encompassed and centered by the presence of the artist, who is usually shown leveling a steady, slightly quizzical gaze at the camera, and the certainty with which he wields his black, male body as shape-shifting subject and material. This happens with special power in “Structural Dishonesty,” a title that resonates with the phrase institutional racism. [More]

Dubai-based art collectors give a peek into their collection

BAZAAR
By
Sleem and Lamia Hasan in the Jumeirah Living apartment in Dubai surrounded by their art. Photography by Ausra Osipaviciute
DUBAI---All of this is an accumulated collection,” says Lamia. “Sleem and I have been married for 10 years but we have been collecting individually for around 20 years – Sleem a little bit longer.” As Lamia explains, Sleem’s is a more eclectic collection with a lot of different artists from all over the world, including from South Africa, the US, and the Middle East. “For the last 20 years I have been collecting mainly Pakistani art and a little bit of Indian art,” she adds. Works by Pakistani masters such as Sadequain, Shahid Jalal, Tassaduq Suhail, Ismail Gulgee and Jamil Naqsh decorate the walls of their apartment exuding much colour and vibrancy. [More]

Collectors Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi have a thing about Rome

THE NEW YORK TIMES
Show Us Your Walls
By Ted Loos
The architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi in their Brooklyn apartment with “KISS,” from a former Times Square adult movie theater; Luigi Rossini’s etching of the Capitoline Hill in Rome; and Lucio Pozzi’s “Parallel Puppet” (1981), a work on paper. Credit Harrison Hill/The New York Times
NEW YORK CITY---For the married architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi, who have run their own firm for 26 years, the current state of the kitchen in their Brooklyn Heights apartment — deeply mid renovation — is an anomaly. Inside the clean-lined apartment, much more the couple’s style, hangs what Mr. Manfredi called “stuff we’ve collected over the years,” and several pieces have a distinct Italian flavor. ”A grouping on the opposite wall includes a “KISS” sign from a former Times Square adult movie theater; Luigi Rossini’s 1823 drypoint etching of the Capitoline Hill in Rome; and Lucio Pozzi’s “Parallel Puppet” (1981), a work on paper. These are edited excerpts from the conversation. [More]

Summer exhibition at the Asia Society in New York explored artists of the South Asian diaspora

HYPERALLERGIC
By Hrag Vartanian
Anila Quayyum Agha, “Crossing Boundaries” (2015) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)
NEW YORK CITY---The short summer exhibition at the Asia Society makes the case for a South Asian perspective born from the life experience of a diaspora that spans the globe. Here, all the artists are conversant with many idioms and vocabularies. One of the only works to be allotted its own space in the exhibition is an installation by Anila Quayyum Agha, who is represented by her well-known Intersections series that was the first artwork to capture both the public and juried prizes at ArtPrize back in 2014. The series, as represented by “Crossing Boundaries” (2015), addresses the boundaries and limitations of gender in her native Pakistan, where religious conservatism had a profound impact on her early life. Closed on August 6, 2017. [More]